SAT Reading Section Tips

Register Next Tests:
11/8 , 12/6

Manage your time

You may want to work on sentence completion questions first. They tend to take less time to answer than the passage-based reading questions. All questions are worth the same number of points regardless of the type or difficulty.

Work on sentence completion questions first. They take less time, and all questions are worth the same number of points.

Question difficulty

The difficulty of sentence completion questions increases as you answer them in order. Reading questions do not increase in difficulty from easy to hard. Instead, they follow the logic of the passage.

Sentence completion questions become more difficult from beginning to end, but passage-based reading questions do not.

Reading carefully is key

The information you need to answer each reading question is always in the passage(s). Reading carefully is the key to finding the correct answer. Don't be distracted by an answer that may look correct but is not supported by the actual text of the passage(s).

Reading carefully is the key to finding the correct answer.

Let line numbers guide you

Reading questions often include line numbers to help direct you to the relevant part(s) of the passage. If one word or more is quoted exactly from the passage, the line number(s) where that quotation can be found will appear in the test question. You may have to read some of the passage before or after the quoted word(s), however, in order to find support for the best answer to the question.

Line numbers can help direct you to the relevant part(s) of the passage.

Reading passages

Do not jump from passage to passage. Stick with a passage until you have answered as many questions as you can before you proceed to the next passage.

Answer as many questions on one passage as you can before proceeding to the next passage.

Stuck on a word

If you don't know what a word means in a sentence completion or reading passage, consider related words, familiar sayings and phrases, roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Have you ever heard or seen a word that may be related to it?

Consider related words, familiar sayings and phrases, roots, prefixes, and suffixes.